A Spotted Flycatcher spotted at Mudchute. Photo via John Archer.

A Spotted Flycatcher spotted at Mudchute. Photo via John Archer.


The following birdwatching news comes from Tower Hamlets Biodiversity Officer John Archer.

There had been a big fall of passage migrant birds in London this week with many species passing through Mudchute on their journeys. First reported on 26th, on 27th was 1 Pied Flycatcher, 2 male Redstarts and 4 to 5 Spotted Flycatchers in the paddocks, along with a few Willow Warblers, Chiffchaffs, Whitethroats, Lesser Whitethroats and Blackcaps. These are probably Scandinavian breeders, brought across on the South-Easterly airstream and grounded by the heavy rain on Wednesday. A few birdwatchers from various parts of London have been visiting Mudchute to see the flycatchers and redstarts.

Have you spotted any unusual birds on the farm? Do send us a tweet @mudchute!

A Redstart spotted at Mudchute. Photo via John Archer.

A Redstart spotted at Mudchute. Photo via John Archer.


A bit of summer and autumn. A common blue butterfly on fallen leaves.

A bit of summer and autumn. A common blue butterfly on fallen leaves.

Today, the fields are bathed in warm sunshine and you could be forgiven for thinking it was still summer. As we begin October, we’re holding onto the mild weather, but there’s an autumnal feel creeping in. Shadows grow longer (as do those fleeces!) and the summer’s glut of flowers and early fruit have given way to the last of the bright red rose hips and rowan berries. Our deciduous trees are just starting to lose their leaves in bold displays of golds and reds. There’s a chill to the air in the mornings and evenings and forecasters tell us colder, blusterier and wetter weather is on its way. But for now, the early days of Autumn are looking beautiful. Get outdoors and make the most of them!

Sheep in the sunshine!

Sheep in the sunshine!

Drafgonflies can still be seen hunting on warm days.

Drafgonflies can still be seen hunting on warm days.

Our alpacas are dwarfed by their lengthening shadows.

Our alpacas are dwarfed by their lengthening shadows.

As the trees lose their leaves, birds like the monk parakeet can be seen high on their perches.

As the trees lose their leaves, birds like the monk parakeet can be seen high on their perches.

Across the farm, leaves are turning red and gold.

Across the farm, leaves are turning red and gold.

The ponies in their new paddock.

The ponies in their new paddock.

Lime leaves are beginning to turn bright yellow.

Lime leaves are beginning to turn bright yellow.

Grey squirrels are busy across the farm, scuffling through leaf litter as they cache fruits and nuts.

Grey squirrels are busy across the farm, scuffling through leaf litter as they cache fruits and nuts.

The first leaves are starting to fall.

The first leaves are starting to fall.


Beautiful autumnal foliage of a hornbeam.

With winter just around the corner, November may seem a quieter time for wildlife than the busy spring and summer, but for the nature lover, there are many species best seen this month. Trees and shrubs are filled with fruits and berries, providing food for migrating birds and a last feast for those about to hibernate. And while most plants have stopped flowering, there is plenty of colour in the falling autumnal foliage. Fungi are also taking advantage of the cool, wet weather with mushrooms and toadstools springing up seemingly overnight! Continue reading